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Permaculture in Ghana: Where Solomon Amuzu Heard His “Call To Nature”

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12007164_900641449983436_1507675547_nI met Solomon Amuzu. Founder and Director of Call To Nature Permaculture, through our mutual work on Extinction Radio. The first thing that struck me, as I am sure it did everyone who listened to his very informative Permaculture Updates, was his competence, knowledge and his great enthusiasm for regenerative agriculture as an answer both to human food security and to environmental challenges in his hometown of Accra, Ghana. Recently, Solomon allowed me to interview him about his various projects and his hopes for the future.

The first question I asked Solomon was how he had heard of permaculture and what attracted him to it. “I learnt permaculture with Gregg Knibbs, an Australian teacher to Ghana.” He was inspired to take that course by an American Peace Corp volunteer named Kate Schachter, whom he describes as “a friend, a mother and a mentor .” Like so many of us, Solomon developed “new eyes” to see the world through permaculture,

“I got interested looking back and seeing how modern agriculture is causing harm to the land and the people through the use of poisonous chemicals.”

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He became convinced that earth care, people care and fair share (the foundational ethical principles of permaculture) were a better answer. Solomon immediately took action to help out in his community. He identified three primary goals: grey water systems could improve water management for greater yields, school gardens would engage kids and ensure they had access to healthier, organic produce and more trees should be planted to fight climate change.

“I was able to raise about 10,000 trees and planted them in many schools in Ghana, even with no financial support.”

11998670_900641466650101_166528556_nThen Solomon lost all motivation. He told me, he became bored and that’s when his friend Kate stepped in again and facilitated his enrolment at Kumasi Institute Of Tropical Agriculture. He graduated in 2010 and went home to Accra. “i decided again to continue with the project i never wanted to do again and there came by the name Call to nature ( which really means i have been called to work with nature).”

I really like this part of Solomon’s story, and i relate to it. How many times have i started out with enthusiasm, then grown bored or frustrated and dropped a project, only to find, years later, life has somehow brought me back to it again, with renewed passion. I also love the way he felt “called” by Nature to care for Her. It’s a beautiful image and an apt name for the project he then formally founded with Samuel Badu Adotey
Rachael Yussif Ramatu. All of them are still under 30. Which is pretty impressive, especially when you consider what they have already accomplished.

Solomon and his friends have not only created gardens for schools, they also share their skills through permaculture education,especially by helping local farmers to incorporate more productive and ecologically sound design and techniques into their farming methods. They are actively restoring the marginal lands around their community, particularly those degraded through road building projects. They are planting trees, teaching and modelling methods beneficial to humans and nature through alley farming and tree planting.

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Recently, Solomon shared with me his advice and information about how he is managing animals in the landscape. For example, he is currently training chickens to prefer a particularly destructive insect thats been infesting local crops. It’s impossible to talk to Solomon about his regenerative work without being impressed and deeply moved by his intelligence, knowledge and deep passion for people and the planet.

If you want to help Solomon, Rachael and Samuel with their Ghanian permaculture initiatives, you can donate through their fundraising campaign. http://www.gofundme.com/n894jw
To contact Solomon directly: Email: calltonature@mail.com, amuzu.solomon@yahol.com Skype: calltonature7035 Call: +233 (0) 204447035 +233 (0) 571325776 or just drop in on Facebook: Solomon Amuzu

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Author: abundantdescent

... an Anglo-Canadian supporter of Idle No More, a diagnosed mad-womyn, resident of the prettiest little town in Southern Ontario, a trained anti-oppressive, feminist, a mom of 3 delightful rebels, a pan-spiritual mysticist, a life partner to a loving & popular bartender, an anarchist, a person blessed with fantastic friends, a mixed media artisan, a formerly homeless "welfare mother," a collapsitarian "doomer," a herder of 2 crazy cats & one teenage momma cat with 4 wee kittens, a permaculture-ing gardener, a long-winded, passionate, fatally-flawed & wise, facially-tattooed crone-in-the-making.

3 thoughts on “Permaculture in Ghana: Where Solomon Amuzu Heard His “Call To Nature”

  1. How inspiring this work Solomon does and his partners, and volunteers. It is great to see the educating of his neighbours to improve their land and growing capacity. And to see the educating of school children by letting them grow food around the school grounds. Congratulations to all these young people.

  2. I am a new contributor to Extinction Radio, a twice-married twice divorced nonviolent anarchist with five grandsons, a member of Humanity and citizen of Earth recently acquainted with Solomon and wanting to support his work in the world. I’d like to hear more about the history of your recent efforts on behalf of Call to Nature and consider how we might collaborate to move that work forward. I’m on Facebook with my true name as shown here. Please include a mention of Solomon when you contact me.

  3. Thanks for your support of Solomon’s work to establish school gardens in greater Accra, Ghana. Now I have created a crowd funding campaign at Patreon for a Call to Nature Permaculture facility for making organic Moringa-based health and beauty products for the local and global market. I’m writing to you because this blog page comes up in the top five results on a google search, and I’m hoping you can support visibility for the project by spotlighting https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2832055&ty=h&u=2832055. I hope you will also visit the Patreon site yourself in support of the project. Thank you!

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